Shetland

Shetland

No one knows for sure when the Shetland Pony first arrived on its native islands, but it was unquestionably thousands of years ago.  Its ancestors may have included ponies and small horses of Celtic, Norse, and even Oriental roots.

However the Shetland Pony came about, isolation on the Shetland Islands with their frequently inhospitable climate shaped it into a small but incredibly tough little breed. Not only could Shetlands live on seaweed alone if necessary, but they grew thick coats, manes, and tails to shelter them from cold, damp air. They worked for their living, too, pulling plows or carts as the occasion required.

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The Dirt-Cheap Green Thumb

The Dirt-Cheap Green Thumb

Gardening on a budget doesn’t mean that you have to sacrifice looks or taste!

The Dirt-Cheap Green Thumb: 400 Thrifty Tips for Saving Money, Time & Resources In and Around the Garden by Rhonda Massingham Hart will show you how to make the most of your gardening dollars, while still enjoying a beautiful and productive garden. These tips will improve your efficiency every step of the way, from choosing your garden site to using the harvest.

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Quarter Horse

Quarter Horse

The Quarter Horse is truly an American breed, reflective of the nation’s changing lifestyle and progress westward. Its earliest ancestors came with the Spanish conquistadors. These horses of various bloodlines were captured by Indians and traded as far as the Atlantic seaboard.

The Spanish-derived Indian ponies, particularly those kept by the Chickasaw, were valued for work by the later English colonists. They were crossed with Thoroughbreds introduced throughout the early 1600s to create the ultimate all-purpose horse—the horse that could plow a field during the week, carry a family to church on the weekend, and provide entertainment in the form of short-distance horse races through town when the occasion required. The all-American horse that excelled at this type of quarter-mile sprinting became known as the C.A.Q.R.H., the Celebrated American Quarter Running Horse.

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The Exodusters: Part 2

The Exodusters: Part 2

When March 1879 hit, the Exodusters were ready to go.

They came from all parts of the South. Mississippi was well represented, as was Texas.  Many Exodusters were from Tennessee, where Benjamin “Pap” Singleton had been particularly active. Others came from Louisiana, Alabama, and Georgia.

Their numbers could only be estimated, but the following spring the postmaster of Topeka stated that somewhere between 15,000 and 20,000 blacks had arrived during the Exodus.

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Poitou

Poitou

For centuries, the Poitou region of France was famous as a center of mule breeding. The area even boasted special breeds of horse and donkey developed exclusively for the purpose—the Poitevin horse, known for its heavy build, and the Poitou donkey, prized for its tall stature and large joints. When the horse and donkey were bred together, the result was a strapping mule ideal for tough work.

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