What Are Milk Components?

What Are Milk Components?

Milk components are a common topic related to dairy cattle. For example, when researching dairy breeds, it is commonly mentioned that Jersey cows have more components in their milk than Holsteins do. So what are the components of milk? There are three main categories: Fat. Protein. Other solids.   Fat When a cow’s rumen digests fiber, it produces fatty acids. Some of these fatty acids … Continue reading What Are Milk Components?

British and Continental Cattle Breeds

British and Continental Cattle Breeds

There are many way to categorize cattle breeds—beef and dairy, standard and miniature, commercial and heritage, Bos taurus taurus and Bos taurus indicus. One classification that is frequently used to describe beef breeds is British versus Continental. The names are rather self-explanatory. British breeds come from the United Kingdom, while Continental breeds come from Continental Europe. But there is more here than meets the eye. … Continue reading British and Continental Cattle Breeds

Kansas Ag Connection

Kansas Ag Connection

Looking for a good way to keep up with daily agriculture-related headlines? Give Kansas Ag Connection a try! Subscribers to On the Range, our weekly country living update (read more), may already be familiar with this site as a source for some of our headlines. There’s a reason for that. Kansas Ag Connection is a clutter-free aggregator of news stories and press releases of interest … Continue reading Kansas Ag Connection

How a Milking Machine Works

How a Milking Machine Works

While many small farmers still love to hand-milk their cows, commercial dairying usually employs the milking machine. The modern milking machine looks complex, but the principle on which it operates is actually quite simple. The machine pulls a vacuum on the teats of the cow, causing the milk to flow. Here’s how it works: The cow’s teats are attached to the teat cups. Each teat … Continue reading How a Milking Machine Works

An Introduction to Heritage Breeds

An Introduction to Heritage Breeds

Thinking about starting a farm with heritage breeds? If you are new to this topic, you may enjoy An Introduction to Heritage Breeds: Saving and Raising Rare-Breed Livestock and Poultry by The Livestock Conservancy. This excellent beginner’s resource starts with the basics—defining breeds in general and heritage breeds in particular. It discusses the plight and importance of rare breeds, as well as the necessity to … Continue reading An Introduction to Heritage Breeds

Cover Crop Decision Tool

Cover Crop Decision Tool

Looking for the right cover crop? Give this Cover Crop Decision Tool from the Midwest Cover Crop Council a try. First select from one of the following states: Iowa. Illinois. Indiana. Kansas. Michigan. Minnesota. Missouri. Ohio. Ontario. Wisconsin. Then choose options that take into account your growing conditions: County (for frost/freeze date estimate). Planting and harvest dates. Drainage situation. Finally, fine-tune your choices by noting … Continue reading Cover Crop Decision Tool

Shetland Sheepdog

Shetland Sheepdog

The Shetland Sheepdog dates back to the Viking invasions of the 9th and 10th centuries. The fierce invaders who colonized the Shetland Islands brought with them small herding spitzes to tend their livestock. These dogs were ideally suited to the harsh climate of the islands, being quite hardy. In the 1470s, however, the Shetland Islands became part of Scotland. The Scottish introduced their own farm … Continue reading Shetland Sheepdog

Rottweiler

Rottweiler

As invading Roman armies traveled, they tended to leave a trail of abandoned dogs in their wake, no matter where they went. The dogs were large and mastiff-like, but they were kept to herd sheep and cattle to feed the soldiers. As the livestock was eaten up, surplus dogs were left behind. One area that became the residence of a sizeable population of abandoned Roman … Continue reading Rottweiler

Redbone Coonhound

Redbone Coonhound

Foxhounds had a long tradition in Virginia, earning a place on large plantations well before the American Revolution. However, after the war, Americans began moving westward, taking their dogs with them. In the backwoods of the South, they started to run into difficulties—foxhounds were bred to chase foxes across the land to their burrows. Many American game animals could climb trees, confusing the dogs. In … Continue reading Redbone Coonhound

Pointer

Pointer

Sometime after 1650, a new kind of dog came into being all across Europe. This dog was the result of mixing various breeds of foxhound, bloodhound, greyhound, and setting spaniel types. Its original purpose was to partner with greyhounds in chasing down hares. The new dog went ahead of the hunters to sniff out the quarry. On finding the game, it froze in a crouching … Continue reading Pointer